Posts Tagged ‘long-term care insurance’

Early Registration For Long Term Care Insurance Association Conference Ending Soon

Wednesday, March 19th, 2014

March 19, 2014 –  Discounted early registration costs to attend the 2014 Long Term Care Insurance Sales Summit end shortly.  The national conference for insurance professionals is organized by the American Association for Long Term Care Insurance, a national trade group.

“There is renewed interest in private insurance solutions now that Americans recognize there are not going to be any government options,” declares Jesse Slome, director of the American Association for Long Term Care Insurance (AALTCI).    The Affordable Care Act had included provisions for a voluntary federal long term care option.  “This was the only part of Obamacare that the White House backed away from.”

“Every day we all get one day older and that’s one day closer to needing long term care as a result of aging,” Slome explains.   “We tell people their risk of needing care is either zero percent or 100 percent and if one acknowledges there is a risk, planning for it makes sense.”

The national LTC Summit takes place May 18-20, 2014 at the Westin Hotel in Kansas City.  Early registration is currently $99 through March 31.  Registration costs increase $100-per-person on April 1 according to the Association.

“There will be three days of powerful workshops featuring many of the nation’s leading experts in the field,” Slome notes.  “Attending is a chance to learn, to hear the latest strategies and to network with experts as well as all the leading insurers in the field.”  Exhibitors include both traditional long term care insurers as well as those offering newer hybrid products including life insurance and annuities that offer long term care options.

The American Association for Long Term Care Insurance provides insurance agents and brokers with ongoing information.  To learn more about the long term care conference visit the Association’s website at www.aaltci.org/2014summit.

Long Term Care Insurance Association Launches Drive To Double Sales Force

Wednesday, March 12th, 2014

March 12, 2014 –  A drive to bring back insurance agents who once sold long term care insurance and recruit new producers interested in hybrid solutions is being undertaken by the American Association for Long Term Care Insurance, a national trade group.

“There’s never been as much consumer interest at the same time as there’s a scarcity of knowledgeable insurance professionals willing and able to offer these solutions,” declares Jesse Slome, director of the American Association for Long Term Care Insurance (AALTCI).    ”We’d like to see several thousand insurance agents gain a knowledge of the present-day fundamentals about both traditional long term care insurance and the alternative LTC solutions in the form of life insurance policies and annuities.”

The Association announced it will offer free access to watch live streams of sessions from the organization’s 2014 national sales conference.  “From the comfort of your home or office, insurance agents and financial advisors will be able to watch between six and eight hours of outstanding sessions featuring top industry experts,” Slome notes.  “One can watch 10 minutes or the full free conference broadcast.”

The Association agreed to waive the $99 registration fee for the conference as part of it’s campaign to increase participation by insurance agents.  “There are thousands of insurance agents who at one time sold long term care insurance but their knowledge is dated and their sales practices are rusty,” Slome explains.  “We’re giving them the opportunity to learn and succeed with really no effort and no cost.”

The 2014 National Long Term Care Solutions Sales Summit takes place May 18-20 in Kansas City.  Free online broadcasts will be handled by Virtual Insurance Conferences and Expos with free registration to view on their website www.insuranceexpos.com.

The American Association for Long Term Care Insurance provides insurance agents and brokers with ongoing information.  To learn more about the organization visit the Association’s website at www.aaltci.org.

Long Term Care Insurance Planning Is Vital For Women Living Alone

Monday, August 6th, 2012

Women living alone have a special need and a considerable pricing advantage when it comes to long term care insurance planning.  The need isn’t likely to change but a number of experts predict the pricing advantage will change in the months and years to come.

After age 50, there are millions of American women living alone as a result of divorce, death of a spouse or simply because they never got married.  Equally important, there are millions who will eventually be living alone as a result of the death of their older male or female partner.   After age 65, women are twice as likely to be living alone.

It is commonly known that women live longer lives than men.  On average they live about five years longer and women are far more likely to reach age 85.  The consequence of living a long life, into your 80s, 90s and even beyond, is the significantly increased likelihood of needing long term care.

There are roughly one million women over the age of 65 occupying beds in the nation’s nursing homes.  By comparison, there are roughly 337,000 men over age 65.  Women are far more likely to suffer from Alzheimer’s disease.  It’s not a pretty picture and far too few women do any planning for this likelihood.  Frankly, there are far too few women planners and other professionals working to educate America’s older women regarding post-retirement planning issues.

Here, however, are the important facts and the current price advantage available to women when it comes to long term care insurance – one of the options available to pay for care.  Women receive roughly two-thirds of all long term care insurance benefit dollars paid out by insurance companies.  They make up 65 percent of all new claims started in 2011 according to the yearly study by the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance.

So, with more risk and more dollars being paid out in claims, it would be natural to think that single women (women living alone) would pay significantly more that a man for long term care insurance.  That is not the case.  All things being equal, a single woman pays the same as a single man.  Rates are what the industry calls unisex.  This is a significant advantage for women – but experts point to changes that will one day eliminate this advantage as part of future policies.  The pricing advantage will not be lost by those who already have insurance coverage.

One final point worth sharing.  Few are aware that in order to obtain long term care insurance one must health qualify.  In simple terms, not everyone can get this coverage and certainly the ability to health qualify drops as one ages and more conditions arise.  Thus, the sweet spot for looking at this coverage is between the ages of 54 and 64.  For a woman living alone, the need to at least get the information is vital.  The peace of mind of knowing you have a plan is priceless … and the savings resulting from the current pricing advantage ain’t bad either.

For additional information on long term care insurance costs or to connect with a specialist member of the Association call (818) 597-3227 or visit the organization’s website.

Mammograms Cut Breast Cancer Deaths By Half

Friday, December 9th, 2011

According to a new study, women who undergo routine mammograms can lower their risk of dying from breast cancer by nearly half.

Researchers in the Netherlands tracked nearly 800 patients who died from breast cancer between the years 1995 and 2003.  These were compared with some 3,700 or more control patients who were matched by age and other measures.

The study found that women who underwent screening reduced their risk of dying from breast cancer by 49 percent.  For women between the ages of  70 and 75, the reduced risk of dying from breast cancer was even higher; 84 percent.   For younger women, those specifically between the ages of 50 to 69, the reduction was smaller, though still significant at 39 percent.

Among the women with breast cancer, nearly 30 percent of tumors were found as a result of the screening and about 34 percent were identified between screens. Nearly 36 percent of these women had never had a mammogram.

“Mammography screening, including the best age to begin, is being debated in the United States,” explains Jesse Slome, executive director of the American Association for Critical Illness Insurance.  “Some experts believe women should start getting them at age 40 while others recommend routine screenings begin at age 50.”

The study findings add to the body of evidence supporting the fact that mammography improves detection and survival.  However, medical researchers noted that is was not clear whether the women who died of cancer got less aggressive treatment or refused treatment. That could have affected survival, of course.

“Heart attack, cancer and stroke are the three leading critical illnesses impacting millions of families each year, ” Slome adds, “which is why we have mounted a campaign to educate individuals between ages 30 and 50 about critical illness insurance protection which pays a lump sum cash amount upon diagnosis of a major condition.”

 

For more information on critical illness insurance, visit the Association’s Consumer Information Center at http://www.criticalillnessinsuranceinfo.org/learning-center/.  For information on long term care insurance, visit the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance’s educational website http://www.aaltci.org/long-term-care-insurance/ – long term care insurance.

Low Vitamin D Levels Linked To Heart Disease

Tuesday, November 29th, 2011

Individuals with low levels of vitamin D in their blood are at significantly higher risk for a variety of heart diseases.

According to a new study increasing levels of vitamin D with supplements reduced a person’s risk of dying from any cause.  The significant reduction was compared to someone who remained deficient in the vitamin.

Researchers at the University of Kansas analyzed data on more than 10,000 patients and reported that 70 percent were deficient in vitamin D and these individuals proved to be at significantly higher risk for a variety of heart diseases.

The scientists reported that D-deficiency also nearly doubled a person’s likelihood of dying.  The study authors note that when individuals corrected the deficiency with supplements they lowered their risk of death by 60 percent.

“Other studies have discussed the importance of vitamin D to good overall health,” explains Jesse Slome, executive director of the American Association for Critical Illness Insurance http://www.criticalillnessinsuranceinfo.org. “It is very valuable to see that there is such a strong relationship between heart disease and vitamin D deficiency.”

Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to a range of illnesses, but few studies have demonstrated that supplements could prevent those outcomes.

Among the individuals tested more than 70 percent of the patients were below 30 Nano grams per milliliter, the level many experts consider sufficient for good health.  After taking into account the patients’ medical history, medications and other factors, cardiologists discovered that those individuals with deficient levels of vitamin D were more than twice as likely to have diabetes, 40 percent more likely to have high blood pressure and about 30 percent more likely to suffer from a diseased heart muscle,  as people without D deficiency.

Previous research has indicated that many Americans don’t have sufficient levels of vitamin D, however. The latest National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey estimated that 25 percent to 57 percent of adults have insufficient levels of D, and other studies have suggested the number is as high as 70 percent.

Nearly one million Americans will have anew coronary attack this year according to AACII and heart attack, cancer and stroke are the three leading critical illnesses impacting millions of families each year.  “Few families are financially prepared for all the uncovered and related expenses,” Slome adds, “which is why we have mounted a campaign to educate individuals between ages 30 and 50 about critical illness insurance protection which pays a lump sum cash amount upon diagnosis of a major condition.”

For more information on critical illness insurance, visit the Association’s Consumer Information Center at http://www.criticalillnessinsuranceinfo.org/learning-center/.  For information on long term care insurance, visit the American Association for Long-Term Care Insurance’s educational website http://www.aaltci.org/long-term-care-insurance/ – long term care insurance.

Small Cuts in Salt Intake Spur Big Drops in Heart Disease

Thursday, January 21st, 2010

According to a study published in the New England Journal of Medicine, the projected reductions would be similar to the benefits accruing from a 50 percent drop in the smoking rate and a 5 percent decline in body mass index among obese adults. 

U.S. health agencies recommend that most adults limit their daily consumption of salt to less than 5.8 grams (2,300 milligrams [mg] of sodium), with 3.7 grams a day preferable. 

The American Heart Association urges the average American to eat less than 2,300 mg of sodium daily, but also notes that older people, blacks and people with high blood pressure need to go even lower — to under 1,500 mg per day. 

Despite these recommendations, the average daily intake of salt is on the increase.  In 2005-2006, the study authors stated, men in the United States took in an average of 10.4 grams of salt a day and women consumed 7.3 grams a day, far more than the suggested limit. 

Excess salt can cause or worsen high blood pressure and raises the risk for cardiovascular disease.  Only about one-quarter of the salt in the U.S. diet comes directly from the kitchen table salt shaker.

The researchers, from the University of California, San Francisco, fed previously published data on heart disease in U.S. adults aged 35 to 84 into a computer model.  The model then predicted that the reduction of 3 grams of salt a day would cut the number of new cases of coronary heart disease each year by 60,000 to 120,000; stroke by 32,000 to 66,000 cases; and heart attacks by 54,000 to 99,000. 

The annual number of deaths from any cause would be reduced by 44,000 to 92,000.  Limiting salt intake would be good for the fiscal diet as well, saving an estimated $10 billion to $24 billion in health care costs yearly, the paper found.

But if Americans cut even a mere 1 gram of salt from their meals and snacks every day, the effects would still be stunning, the authors stated: 20,000 to 40,000 fewer cases of coronary heart disease; 18,000 to 35,000 fewer heart attacks; 11,000 to 23,000 fewer strokes; and 15,000 to 32,000 fewer deaths. 

Reported by the American Association for Critical Illness Insurance, the national non-profit trade organization.